Friday, May 21, 2010

oil paintings and water colors


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2 comments:

aurelio said...

Hectocotylus...very interesting way to visually 'speak' to the recent oil-spill disaster... & with this exploration I'm provoked to ask what else can we see about our dependence, what other patterns are there, what is it about oil that we have not noticed, what is it about this crude-oil as fuel that we have not looked at?

thank you...

Hectocotylus said...

Aurelio - it's nice to hear from you again.

I'm glad you like this post; I wasn't sure how people were going to view it. Outside of reaffirming the old adage that beauty can be found amidst even the worst atrocities (or in the ugliest of things), the first thing I thought after seeing images from the recent oil spill was how funny it was that it took us so long to develop abstract art when nature has been creating it since the dawn of time! (Outside of some early cave paintings, perhaps, which were probably trying for accurate visual representation and might have become somewhat abstract for other reasons. I'm sure you know more about the history of painting than I do.) And it's interesting that the rise of abstract art coincided with people's feelings of alienation with the (natural?) world, heightened by the industrial revolution and, well, the rise of oil.